Differences in Training and Licensure Between Psychiatrists and Psychologists
 

Psychiatrist Training

  • Undergraduate degree - generally in a life sciences major
  • Four years of medical school
    • Physiology
    • Pharmacology
    • Medical psychology/human behavior
    • Anatomy and neuroanatomy
    • Diagnosis and treatment
    • Clerkships in all major areas of medicine
  • Internship (one year - primarily inpatient)
    • Psychiatry
    • Neurology
    • General medicine
    • Surgery and surgical specialties
    • Intensive care units
    • Emergency Department
    • Pediatrics
  • Residency (three years)
    • Diagnosis and differential therapeutics
    • Inpatient psychiatry
    • Outpatient psychiatry
    • Child and adolescent psychiatry
    • Neurology
    • Addictions / detox
    • Pharmacology
    • Neuroscience
    • Psychotherapy (individual, group, families, and couples)
    • Application of psychological testing to clinical care
    • Forensic psychiatry
    • Disability Evaluations
    • Research design and methods
  • Forensic Certification (fellowship or experience and examination)
    • Interface of psychiatry and the law
    • Landmark cases
    • Trial procedure
    • Rules of Evidence
    • Competency
    • Criminal responsibility
    • Reliability of memory
    • False confessions
    • Witness behavior (spousal abuse, rape, assault)
    • Elements of Extenuation

Graduation from medical school requires successful completion of National Board of Medical Examiners step 1 and step 2 examinations. Licensure requires successful completion of the step 3 examination and completion of an internship. Certifications in psychiatry and forensic psychiatry are through the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology.

 

Psychologist Training

  • Undergraduate degree - generally in psychology or humanities
  • Master in psychology (two years)
    • Normal and abnormal psychology
    • Diagnosis - diagnostic nosology
    • Psychotherapy
    • Psychological Testing
    • Extern training in an outpatient setting
  • Doctoral degree (two years)
    • Advance theory of psychology and human behavior
    • Psychotherapeutic techniques
    • Psychological testing
    • Neuropsychological testing
    • Research design and methods
    • Completion of a dissertation
  • Internship (one year - primarily outpatient)
    • Psychologial and neuropsychological testing
    • Individual psychotherapy
    • Group psychotherapy
    • Couples and family therapy
  • One year of supervision following completion of internship required for licensure

Licensure is by state, with no standardized national examination required for licensure - no standardized examination for forensic psychology